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Windows 10 Default Settings Issue

Microsoft has responded to Windows 10 users’ privacy fears by insisting that it does not scan emails, messages or files for advertising purposes.

When Windows 10 launched some users complained that Microsoft had compromised their privacy due to its default settings.

It was later revealed that even when all data collection settings were turned off Windows 10 still sent identifiable data to Microsoft.

Now Microsoft has moved to clarify the types of data it collects. Terry Myerson, Microsoft’s executive vice president of Windows and Devices said: “

No matter what privacy options you choose, neither Windows 10 nor any other Microsoft software scans the content of your email or other communications, or your files, in order to deliver targeted advertising to you.”

Myerson explained that Windows 10 collects two types of data. The first is designed to help Microsoft and third-parties identify bugs or problems in software – items such as crash logs, system information and other diagnostic data.

“This doesn’t include any of your content or files,” says Myerson. “And we take several steps to avoid collecting any information that directly identifies you, such as your name, email address or account ID.”

Behavioral data for Cortana and personalization

Windows 10 also collects information on user habits in the name of personalization. Microsoft’s digital assistant Cortana collects the most, but it and other settings that remember preferences such as favorite sports teams and commonly typed words can be disabled.

This type of personalization and behavioral data is commonly used by other platforms for digital assistants and other machine learning processes that adjust to the user, such as Google Now, Siri and autocorrect software for keyboards.

However, when all personalization features were turned off Windows 10 was found to send personally identifiable data associated with Microsoft’s OneDrive and an unknown content delivery network.

Microsoft has been under fire from privacy advocates with some describing Windows 10 as the most invasive Windows yet. It has also seen issues with compulsory automatic updates, and has been seen to download itself onto user machines without permission, but is considered to be the best Windows version yet.

Windows 10 OS

As with any product that’s still in development, running Windows 10 Technical Preview has risks. The safest and easiest way to install and work with the preview of the next Windows is within a virtual machine — here’s how.

VPCs are not only safe and simple to set up — you can run them on just about any operating system. And in this case, both Windows 10 Preview and the virtual PC software are 100 percent free. Best of all, running in a VPC, Windows 10 Preview presents essentially no risk to your primary (host) system. It’s as if Win10 were installed on its own, separate, physical PC!

The three major steps to get everything going

These steps assume that you don’t have virtual-PC software already installed. As with that earlier Windows 8 article, we’ll use Oracle’s VirtualBox. Not only is it free, but it’s highly capable and relatively easy to set up. (Note: VirtualBox is updated frequently. If you already have it installed, now is a good time to get the latest version.) The steps are:

  • Download and install VirtualBox on a standard PC;
  • Use VirtualBox to create a new virtual machine that’s optimized for running Win10 Preview;
  • Download Win10 Preview and install it on the new virtual machine.
  • Before you begin, some important preliminaries

The requirements for running Win10 Preview inside a VirtualBox VPC are relatively modest. The vast majority of today’s PCs, running any current version of Windows — Vista, Win7, or Win8 — will likely meet or exceed the minimum specifications.

Here’s what you need:

  • At least 3GB of system RAM: Win10 Preview needs at least 1GB of RAM, VirtualBox needs about another 512MB, and the host system typically needs at least another 1GB or so. Add a skosh more memory for shared system functions. It’s better to have more than 3GB of RAM — the typical PC sold today comes with 6GB to 12GB. (To quickly check your system’s installed memory, click Start/Control Panel/System. In the System section, look for the heading “Installed memory [RAM].”)
  • A minimum 30GB of available disk space: Win10 Preview needs about 25GB of free space plus another 4GB or so for the Win10 installation file — but as with RAM, more free drive space is always better. (You will, of course, get that space back when you delete the Win10 VPC.) The Win10 virtual machine doesn’t need to reside on your primary (C:) drive, but this will make the setup process a bit easier.

Hardware-virtualization support: Almost all PCs sold in recent years feature built-in, hardware-level support for the kind of virtualization used by VirtualBox (and similar VPC/VM products). But older systems might not have this needed feature.

Learn More About Windows 10 Launch

The mighty Microsoft marketing system is taking an entirely new approach to introducing the next Windows. Here are the facts, not the hype.

By now, most Windows users know that Microsoft has instituted a reservation system for downloading Windows 10, once it formally starts shipping this July 29. Getting Windows users to reserve a place at the Win10 launch table is a novel concept — as was the Technical Preview program that’s been in place for the past few months. Although there are some good aspects to the reservation system, it also has problems and is simply unnecessary.

As you probably know by now, Windows 10 will be a free upgrade for all qualified Windows systems — i.e., mostly personal and “genuine” Win7 and Win8.1 machines — for a full year after its July 29 release. That’s not exactly a short window for deciding whether you want the free upgrade. (Reportedly, if you miss that one-year window, you’ll have to pay for the OS. And if you haven’t updated from Win8 to 8.1, a necessary requirement for Win10, you’re way overdue to do so.)

Contrary to some rumors, there will not be any sort of subscription fee after you upgrade. Microsoft will send free updates for the life of the OS.

Possibly the one useful aspect of the Win10 reservation system is that it runs a check of your system to see whether it’s ready for the new OS. The “Get Windows 10″ application that suddenly appeared on many Windows systems earlier this month includes a “Check my PC” option. As long as you’ve kept up on patches in Windows Update, updating to Win10 should be relatively uncomplicated for most current PCs.

Windows 10 Pro and Windows 10 Enterprise users will be able to delay updates, using what Microsoft calls a “Current branch” or a “Long-term servicing branch.” For the consumer versions of Win10, users will be able to delay update installs only by choosing when to reboot their systems — generally for a few days at most. There will be no option to hide updates, as we currently can in all versions of Win7 and Win8.

Again, the specifics are still to come. But as I understand it, any delay installing updates will apply only to nonsecurity fixes that we now see as “optional.” Moreover, security patches may be automatically deployed at any time.

 

Learn Some Of Windows 10 Errors

Windows 10 sends identifiable information to Microsoft, even if a user turns off its Bing search and Cortana features, and activates the software’s privacy-protection settings.

Analysis by technology site Ars Technica has shown that Windows 10 still contacts Microsoft even when these features are disabled, although some of this is simple and non-identifiable testing for an internet connection.

However, other bits of information sent to and requested from Microsoft, including those associated with the company’s cloud storage service, OneDrive, and to an unknown content delivery network, have a user identification number attached.

The machines used for the test were using a local login to Windows 10, not a Microsoft account, and had OneDrive, Cortana, live tiles and every other privacy-protecting setting active.

Windows 10 also downloaded new tile information from its MSN news and information service, despite the live-tile feature not being active on the test machine. The request had no identifiable information, but was also not encrypted.

Privacy worries

The report will add more fuel to the debate about Windows 10 and privacy, after Microsoft came under fire for the default settings in its new operating system.

“As part of delivering Windows 10 as a service, updates may be delivered to provide ongoing new features to Bing search, such as new visual layouts, styles and search code,” said Microsoft, in response to Ars Technica’s report.

“No query or search usage data is sent to Microsoft, in accordance with the customer’s chosen privacy settings. This also applies to searching offline for items such as apps, files and settings on the device.”

However, the information sent to and requested from Microsoft after customers activated privacy-protecting settings, was not related to search.

Microsoft did not elaborate on what purpose the communications have, or whether it stores or tracks the data, which includes machine identification numbers. The company has not responded to requests for further comment.

Microsoft also released an update to fix a problem with one of its mandatory Windows 10 updates, which should prevent the endless install failure and rebooting issues that users had been suffering from, according to the company.

 

Steps To Test Windows 10 Operating System

As with any product that’s still in development, running Windows 10 Technical Preview has risks. The safest and easiest way to install and work with the preview of the next Windows is within a virtual machine — here’s how.

VPCs are not only safe and simple to set up — you can run them on just about any operating system. And in this case, both Windows 10 Preview and the virtual PC software are 100 percent free. Best of all, running in a VPC, Windows 10 Preview presents essentially no risk to your primary (host) system. It’s as if Win10 were installed on its own, separate, physical PC!

The three major steps to get everything going

These steps assume that you don’t have virtual-PC software already installed. As with that earlier Windows 8 article, we’ll use Oracle’s VirtualBox. Not only is it free, but it’s highly capable and relatively easy to set up. (Note: VirtualBox is updated frequently. If you already have it installed, now is a good time to get the latest version.) The steps are:

  • Download and install VirtualBox on a standard PC;
  • Use VirtualBox to create a new virtual machine that’s optimized for running Win10 Preview;
  • Download Win10 Preview and install it on the new virtual machine.
  • Before you begin, some important preliminaries

The requirements for running Win10 Preview inside a VirtualBox VPC are relatively modest. The vast majority of today’s PCs, running any current version of Windows — Vista, Win7, or Win8 — will likely meet or exceed the minimum specifications.

Here’s what you need:

  • At least 3GB of system RAM: Win10 Preview needs at least 1GB of RAM, VirtualBox needs about another 512MB, and the host system typically needs at least another 1GB or so. Add a skosh more memory for shared system functions. It’s better to have more than 3GB of RAM — the typical PC sold today comes with 6GB to 12GB. (To quickly check your system’s installed memory, click Start/Control Panel/System. In the System section, look for the heading “Installed memory [RAM].”)
  • A minimum 30GB of available disk space: Win10 Preview needs about 25GB of free space plus another 4GB or so for the Win10 installation file — but as with RAM, more free drive space is always better. (You will, of course, get that space back when you delete the Win10 VPC.) The Win10 virtual machine doesn’t need to reside on your primary (C:) drive, but this will make the setup process a bit easier.

Hardware-virtualization support: Almost all PCs sold in recent years feature built-in, hardware-level support for the kind of virtualization used by VirtualBox (and similar VPC/VM products). But older systems might not have this needed feature.

Things That Microsoft Should Change For Windows 10

If there is one thing we know about Windows 10, it is that the Start menu will not be missing this time. Microsoft, which reveals more details about the latest iteration of its operating system later today, needs to get at least that right after the miscalculation of Windows 8.

The new operating system, the first under new boss Satya Nadella, replaces the unpopular Windows 8, an operating system that was arguably ahead of its time. Replacing the Start menu with the Start screen, big interactive tiles, slide-out menus and full-screen apps all made Windows 8 great on a touchscreen device, but frustrating at best on a desktop or laptop with a keyboard and mouse.

An update, Windows 8.1, revived the Start button, but did little to convince users to upgrade, resulting in poor sales of the now two and a half year old operating system. Windows 7 accounts for 56% of the desktop computer market, according to Netmarketshare data, leaving Windows 8 and 8.1 languishing on just 15%. Even the now 14-year-old Windows XP is still running on 18% of desktops despite no longer being supported by Microsoft.

Window 10 doesn’t have to beat Windows 8 – it has to entice consumers and business users to upgrade from Windows 7 given that the days of routine upgrades are long gone.

The desktop

Windows 10 must have a solid, reinvigorated desktop experience. Previews of the operating system indicate Microsoft understands that this is the crucial piece of the puzzle that could dissuade businesses from upgrading if it gets it wrong.

Wanting to improve the desktop experience is perfectly understandable, but it must remain familiar and easy to use. Most business users will simply want software like Microsoft Office to work fast and efficiently. The same goes for home users, who could be instantly put off by something that doesn’t vaguely resemble their ideas of how a computer should work.

However, it must also function well on tablets, hybrid touchscreen computers and smartphones. Microsoft’s “continuum” promises to do just that by detecting whether a keyboard and mouse are attached and presenting the right interface for the device.

 

Windows 10 Error: Scan E-mails For Advertisement Purposes

Microsoft has responded to Windows 10 users’ privacy fears by insisting that it does not scan emails, messages or files for advertising purposes.

When Windows 10 launched some users complained that Microsoft had compromised their privacy due to its default settings.It was later revealed that even when all data collection settings were turned off Windows 10 still sent identifiable data to Microsoft.

Now Microsoft has moved to clarify the types of data it collects. Terry Myerson, Microsoft’s executive vice president of Windows and Devices said: “

No matter what privacy options you choose, neither Windows 10 nor any other Microsoft software scans the content of your email or other communications, or your files, in order to deliver targeted advertising to you.”

Myerson explained that Windows 10 collects two types of data. The first is designed to help Microsoft and third-parties identify bugs or problems in software – items such as crash logs, system information and other diagnostic data.

“This doesn’t include any of your content or files,” says Myerson. “And we take several steps to avoid collecting any information that directly identifies you, such as your name, email address or account ID.”

Behavioral data for Cortana and personalization

Windows 10 also collects information on user habits in the name of personalization. Microsoft’s digital assistant Cortana collects the most, but it and other settings that remember preferences such as favorite sports teams and commonly typed words can be disabled.

This type of personalization and behavioral data is commonly used by other platforms for digital assistants and other machine learning processes that adjust to the user, such as Google Now, Siri and autocorrect software for keyboards.

However, when all personalization features were turned off Windows 10 was found to send personally identifiable data associated with Microsoft’s OneDrive and an unknown content delivery network.

Microsoft has been under fire from privacy advocates with some describing Windows 10 as the most invasive Windows yet. It has also seen issues with compulsory automatic updates, and has been seen to download itself onto user machines without permission, but is considered to be the best Windows version yet.

Identifiable Data Send By Windows 10 Despite Of Privacy Settings

Windows 10 sends identifiable information to Microsoft, even if a user turns off its Bing search and Cortana features, and activates the software’s privacy-protection settings.

Analysis by technology site Ars Technica has shown that Windows 10 still contacts Microsoft even when these features are disabled, although some of this is simple and non-identifiable testing for an internet connection.

However, other bits of information sent to and requested from Microsoft, including those associated with the company’s cloud storage service, OneDrive, and to an unknown content delivery network, have a user identification number attached.

The machines used for the test were using a local login to Windows 10, not a Microsoft account, and had OneDrive, Cortana, live tiles and every other privacy-protecting setting active.

Windows 10 also downloaded new tile information from its MSN news and information service, despite the live-tile feature not being active on the test machine. The request had no identifiable information, but was also not encrypted.

Privacy worries

The report will add more fuel to the debate about Windows 10 and privacy, after Microsoft came under fire for the default settings in its new operating system.

“As part of delivering Windows 10 as a service, updates may be delivered to provide ongoing new features to Bing search, such as new visual layouts, styles and search code,” said Microsoft, in response to Ars Technica’s report.

“No query or search usage data is sent to Microsoft, in accordance with the customer’s chosen privacy settings. This also applies to searching offline for items such as apps, files and settings on the device.”

However, the information sent to and requested from Microsoft after customers activated privacy-protecting settings, was not related to search.

Microsoft did not elaborate on what purpose the communications have, or whether it stores or tracks the data, which includes machine identification numbers. The company has not responded to requests for further comment.

Microsoft also released an update to fix a problem with one of its mandatory Windows 10 updates, which should prevent the endless install failure and rebooting issues that users had been suffering from, according to the company.

Microsoft Applications Are Coming To iPhone And Android With Windows 10

Yes! You read it right. According to most computer expert, new Microsoft applications are coming to both iPhone and Android after updating their recent operating system to Windows 10 version. But the question here is whether these changes will make difference in a longer term.

“The apps that people want on smartphones are not being written for desktop Windows anyway. Uber doesn’t have a desktop Windows app, and neither does Instacart, Pinterest or Instagram. The apps and services that consumers care about are either smartphone-only or address the desktop using the web. The smartphone is the sun and everything else orbits it.” – says Benedict Evans from Andreesen Horowitz company.

Windows 10 operating system continues to update gradually; and according to Microsoft, it’s their last “giant hit” release. Future Windows upgrade will become piecemeal and will be pushed over on the internet.

Here are some of the newest features of Windows 10:

  • Cortana – This voice-driven assistant may setup tasks for users and may also do some basic searches using Apple’s Siri and Voice Search from Google
  • Edge – This new browser will replace Internet Explorer browser used by computer users for over 20 years
  • Continuum – This scales your interface up & down. You may also plug your Windows tablet to a keyboard and make it work like desktop computers.
  • Improved photo, calendar, and mail apps

Watch Out: Windows 10 OS is approximately 6GB download. If your broadband capacity is limited, it could drain up quickly since the download automatically runs after opting for automatic system updates.

Here’s How To Put The New Windows 10 OS To Your Computer?

As promised by Microsoft Company, they have finally issued a technical preview of the newest Windows version. This new operating system update is indeed quite interesting because of the fact that it is new, users can expect that it has something to offer that others can’t. Maybe in there are similar features, still, Windows 10 is quite enhanced and improved although we cannot reject the possibilities that technical flaws may still be present.

For UK and US English, Brazilian Portuguese, Chinese, and other languages, there are 32-bit and 64-bit versions available. If you wish to try this newest Windows version, simply follow all these instructions and install the technical preview of Windows 10 operating system to your computer device.

Be Prepared

With preview and beta software, you should never install it not unless you are fully prepared. That simply means that you should first back up all the important files stored in your system. You should also have a separate partition or hard drive where you can install the technical preview of Windows 10 OS. Another thing is that you can never revert from the technical preview of Windows 10 to your Windows 7 and Windows 8 operating system. So in case you have any second thoughts about it, you may reinstall it from scratch.

Download the Technical Preview of Windows 10

To start with, head on to the site: preview.windows.com and immediately join their Insider Program. If you have your own Microsoft account already then this process may only take few clicks to get done.

This time, you have to download the correct installation file for your computer system. This is the 64-bit version if you are using the old version. But if you want to try its 32-bit version, then maybe you can just get the 32-bit version download instead. The entire process may take for a while to complete but the 64-bit file download is only below 4GB.

When the ISO file is fully downloaded, burn it to a DVD or transfer it to a USB drive. If your device has already Windows 8 OS version, burning files to a DVD is just so easy. Now if you wish to install the fresh copy of Windows 10 to your computer, simply restart your device and boot from your DVD/USB stick drive, and then follow all the instructions displayed on your screen.